Shiplap Love.

So, I did it. I gave in and jumped on the shiplap bandwagon, and you know what? I’m just wishing I did it sooner! Ladies! It turned out so good and really adds flare and personality to my entryway. The time, planning, supplies and skill level are very minimal. This certainly was one of my most fun projects I’ve done to date!

To start, I really had a strong dislike for my entryway. So bland and plain. I use the garage door 99% of the time and totally bypass the foyer, but that 1% of the time, gross! I knew I had to do something with it. I took my time, scoured Pintrest for all the ideas, and decided I love the soft yet textured look of shiplap. Like most people, I wanted to do a quality project for a low budget so my research continued. I came across a lot of great blog posts on the best budget friendly materials to use for this project. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4’ x 8’ underlayment plywood- ¼” in thickness (I used 2 sheets)
  • Nail gun 
  • Nails
  • Air compressor
  • Level
  • Tape measure
  • Stud finder
  • Circular saw, table saw, or miter saw

Ok, those aren’t all, but are the materials you need to start and get the project on the wall. To put the finishing touches on the wall, you will need a few more supplies that I will list shortly.

I would recommend bringing a project pal to the Home Depot to assist in getting your plywood pieces off the shelf. If you smile and ask nicely, I am certain a helpful employee will assist you as well. Don’t be too freaked out about the bends in the boards. Once you get them cut and up on the wall they will be unnoticable. I wanted my boards cut to 8 inch width because I like the thicker look; standard width from my research is 6 inches. It will only take the employees at the Home Depot a couple of minutes to cut you boards. Gather whatever other supplies you need during this trip; makes it easier than making multiple trips to get what you need. The Home Depot will also rent power tools for 4 or 24 hours. This is nice especially for the compressor, nail gun and saw if you don’t already have these items.

Now, it’s wall prep time. For my project, I did not have to paint it a light color because it already was. If it is dark, would be a good idea to put one coat of light paint so you don’t see the dark through the spaces. Next, use the stud finder to mark where the studs are. I marked at the bottom and at the top of each stud and used the chalk line. This isn’t necessary as you can use a level and pencil to bring the lines all the way down. Just like that, prep is done. Easy, right!?

Time for the fun part! Cutting and nailing! Measure the length of your wall (twice, please!), measure that same length for the first board and cut with either your circular or miter saw. I started at the top of the wall because I wanted any pieces that would be thinner than 8 inches at the bottom and to be less noticable. The width of my wall was 50.5 inches so I had to make a cut every row. If you are doing a very large area, you may not have to make as many cuts. Dry fit your piece before nailing it up to ensure it is a proper fit and that you didn’t have an ‘oops’ cut. It fits!? Great job girl!! See, that wasn’t so hard! Now get to nailing! Instead of lining up the board flush with the ceiling, but your level at the bottom and line the piece up to that. Most celings are not  level and you do not, I repeat, do not want your shiplap to be crooked. Once you have it leveled, with the other hand put your first nail in along one of your chalk lines either near the top or the bottom of the board; approximatly ½ inch to inch from the edge. . Exhilierating, right!? I must say the nail gun is my new favorite tool! Now go to town and nail that board down! Put two nails, top and bottom, at every stud line. If there is any gapping, or boards not flush with the wall, feel free to add a nail or two to secure it.

Use the leftover bit of the board from the one you just nailed up to start your next row. It is OK if it is shorter than the length you need. Nail it up using the above process. To get a gap in between the layers, use a couple of pennies as your spacers. It will ensure all spaces are equal and they will stay nicely while you are nailing the board down. To get your next board to fit, measure from the wall to the end of the board you just nailed up. You will put each board end to end, no space is necessary. Conitnue this process all the way down to the bottom. And don’t stress girlfriend, all the rows that have two pieces of board, we will patch those so they look seamless like one board.

You’ve made it to your last row! You are about done with the hard work an almost to the finishing stages! To get this last row right, measure from the bottom of the row you just installed to your ending point (for me it was my baseboard). Now insert the penny between your tape measure and the row. This will give you the proper height of this row. Make sure to measure twice and mark this for the width of your last board. Cut with the saw you have on hand; now happily and with fervor nail that last board down! You did it! You got your ship lap on the wall!!

Now for the items you will need to finish your project:

  • Palm sander (optional)
  • Sandpaper- 120 grit  
  • Drywall spackle
  • Putty knife
  • Caulk
  • Caulking gun
  • Paint
  • Paint pan
  • Paint liner
  • Paint brush
  • Paint roller

You might be wondering why I chose drywall spackle. Well, it covers nicely and sands easily. I don’t like wood filler because it doesnt dry quckly and its not as easy to use as drywal spackle. Use your putty knife and smear a thin layer of spackle over all board seams as well as all nail holes. Do not skip this step unless you want a more rustic look. I wanted a sleek, modern shiplap look so this was necessary for the results I wanted.

Once dry (I always wait 24 hours to ensure totally dry), by hand or with the palm sander, sand all spackle until it is flush with the wood. I also did a light layer of sanding across all the boards to achieve a smooth surface. Next, caulk all the edges where the board meets the wall. This step can be done right after the hole patching so it can dry at the same time. When using the caulk, apply a thin bead along the edges where the board meets the wall and ceiling. Using your finger, run it down the bead and remove any access. Note, this step is messy so have a wet cloth on hand to wipe off your messy fingers to avoid build up on the walls or the boards.

Girl, you are so close!!! Everything is dried and sanded, now its time for paint! All it took was one coat of paint for me. I did a bit extra though. I tapped all the edges and then painted those edges the color of the wall they were butted up against. Yes, you read that right! The reason I do this is so any paint that leaks through is the color of the wall and not the color I am using on the shiplap. I love this step even though it is extra work becuase it achieves really sharp paint lines and makes the job look perfect. Once dried, I then go over those edges with a paint brush and the color the shiplap will be. I chose a light grey that I had extra from a spare bedroom. It is Behr Premium Plus Ultra in satin, color Silver Marlin. This paint can found exclusively at the Home Depot. Remove the tape within a few minutes of the completed paint job for ease.

And that’s it! Congrats girl! You successfully completed your first shiplap project! Wasnt it fun? And really, not that time consuming. Sit back, smile, and enjoy that wall! Leave a comment below or a link to your site so I can see your completed wall!

Bye for now babes,

Elisa

P.S. apologies for the poor quality of the images; this was prior to my new camera.

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

shiplap accent wall- elisacarrie.com

 

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